Public Health Insight

Racism, the Black Experience, and the Perpetual Fight for Equality (Part 2)

June 16, 2020
Public Health Insight
Racism, the Black Experience, and the Perpetual Fight for Equality (Part 2)
Chapters
Public Health Insight
Racism, the Black Experience, and the Perpetual Fight for Equality (Part 2)
Jun 16, 2020

On Monday, May 25th, 2020, George Floyd, a 46-year old African American man was killed while in police custody in Minneapolis, Minnesota in the United States. This was the straw that broke the camel's back and has sparked outrage across the country and in other cities across the world. For centuries, the black community has experienced systemic racism and discrimination, particularly at the hand of whites who have been in a historical position of power still to this day. While black men disproportionately experience negative outcomes when interacting with police, black women are also overrepresented in police violence - they are also mothers, sisters, aunts, partners, and friends of these male victims. In Part 2 of the Two-Part State of the Union Roundtable Series, we continue our discussions, from the previous episode, about moving beyond initial discomfort for a more open dialogue on the topic of racism to the urgency and need to sustain the momentum generated by societal outrage in order to achieve meaningful long-term change. We also share some powerful TV shows and movies that can serve as good educational tools about the subject of anti-black racism in the context of the United States.


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Show Notes

On Monday, May 25th, 2020, George Floyd, a 46-year old African American man was killed while in police custody in Minneapolis, Minnesota in the United States. This was the straw that broke the camel's back and has sparked outrage across the country and in other cities across the world. For centuries, the black community has experienced systemic racism and discrimination, particularly at the hand of whites who have been in a historical position of power still to this day. While black men disproportionately experience negative outcomes when interacting with police, black women are also overrepresented in police violence - they are also mothers, sisters, aunts, partners, and friends of these male victims. In Part 2 of the Two-Part State of the Union Roundtable Series, we continue our discussions, from the previous episode, about moving beyond initial discomfort for a more open dialogue on the topic of racism to the urgency and need to sustain the momentum generated by societal outrage in order to achieve meaningful long-term change. We also share some powerful TV shows and movies that can serve as good educational tools about the subject of anti-black racism in the context of the United States.


Follow us on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook. We would love it if you shared your thoughts with us through direct message on your social media platform of choice or by emailing us at ThePublicHealthInsight@gmail.com.


Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/publichealthinsight)